Over the past two decades, the biopharmaceutical industry has emerged as one of the major manufacturing industries of growth in the US and around the world. Biomanufacturing represents nearly 2% of the total US GDP (Carlson, 2011) and its fraction is growing (Glaser, 2013). Much of biomanufacturing involves the application of mammalian cells, especially Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, to produce therapeutic proteins and other biologics, i.e. biopharmaceuticals.  Our biomanufacturing research will focus on the upstream development of cell lines and production processes.

With the advent of wealth of new biological information brought about in large part through the revolutions in ‘omics and data quality, and manufacturing efficiencies. These changes provide an abundance of precompetitive research challenges for the biomanufacturing community in the upstream area to realize a future where biological knowledge can be harnessed to produce biologics more efficiently and effectively in a reliable and standardized framework.

 

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